A Dangerous Experience

Your Name Instructor Name Course Number Date A Dangerous Experience That dreadful summer afternoon is still fresh in my mind for almost a decade now. I was eight years old. My parents, my cousin, and I were on a motorboat in a deep lake for an anticipated adventurous experience in Central North Carolina that turned out to be my worst scary experience. We were enjoying the afternoon. Unfortunately, there was a sudden toggle switch on the boat. My mother asked my father what the switch was for, and he said he did not know as he flipped the switch. Suddenly, there was a low but distinctive explosion. I immediately smelled gas and saw flames oozing out of our boat. We started shouting and scrambling for our dear life as the fire rapidly engulfed our boat. Fortunately, we had our life jackets on. My mother tried to push my cousin and me off the boat into the water. She struggled to push me because my life jacket somehow hanged up on one of the metal pieces of the boat. I also tried to pull myself out of the boat to no success. I was so terrified that I felt my blood veins clang together, and my whole body turned so cold. I tried to cover my head for a moment, and when I looked up again, the flames were above my head. I knew that was the end of my life. I was stuck there, and neither my mother nor I could pull the metal piece that held my jacket. I remember pleading with my mother not to let me die in the boat fire because I thought she could lose hope and jump out of the boat to save her life, leaving me to die. She looked at me, and then all of a sudden, she seemed powered and spirited to save me. "Let pull one more time, Joe," she said as she gathered all her might to save her dying son. I think she even forgot that she was in the same danger. It still did not work. She screamed even harder for help as she flipped over me. I remember as she was screaming, the fire had briefly touched my left leg, and I felt so scared. It was so hot that it did not seem real. Nothing did. The next thing I remember is all of us in the water and struggling to swim. I could not swim, so I tried to hold on to my father to remain afloat. There was a lot of shouting of terror and despair as the boat continued burning, emitting black acrid smoke that continued choking us. There was a lot of gasoline, and the entire boat began to sink. At that juncture, I felt like we were drowning too, I could not breathe, and the fire was all over the water. The flames again got me. This time the back of my jacket and my whole head were burning. I thought we had lost it, and I was so scared and nervous. Finally, my father, still struggling to keep himself and my cousin afloat, came to my rescue. He tried to push me deeper into the waters, and I saw strong flames above my head when I tried to look up. I did not know what strategy my father used because, after a few seconds, the fire above my head was no more, but I think he pushed me deep into the waters to avoid being burnt. He then pulled me back again above the surface. This time I felt like there was more gasoline and the fire on the water was a real phenomenon. We had struggled for about half an hour, and no help was coming forth. We felt like giving up. Fortunately, there was a large pontoon boat that came to our rescue. We were all gathered alive. My left leg had suffered a slight burn. I do not know how the fire was put off or whether the boat is still under the waters. All I know is we were saved. To date, I have never known what caused the toggle switch, but the memory of the flames, sinking boat, and swimming as fire rushes through the same water still scares me to death. However, none of us died that day by the water or by fire, which makes me appreciate life.

Your Name Instructor Name Course Number Date A Dangerous Experience That dreadful summer aftern...